Movies

Abortions illegal in Texas, effective date unknown, says state AG

Abortion will be illegal in Texas, but when that takes effect is still unknown, said Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton moments after the US Supreme Court overturned Roe v Wade, leaving abortions rights up to states.

In 2021, Texas passed a trigger law, the Human Life Protection Act, that would restrict abortions within 30 days of any high court ruling giving states the authority to outlaw abortions. Anyone who performs or helps provide an abortion could be charged with a first-degree felony and a $100,000 penalty.

The exact date the prohibition on abortion goes into effect in the Lone Star State is still not known, said Paxton.

“The (Supreme) Court issued its opinion, reversing Roe, but it has yet to issue its judgement,” explained the attorney general. “The Court will issue its judgement only after the window for the litigants to file a motion for rehearing has closed.”

Pro-choice supporters react outside the Supreme Court in the wake of the seismic ruling.
AFP via Getty Images
Protestors gather in Washington, D.C..
Protestors gather in Washington, D.C..
James Keivom
Activists hold signs after the Supreme Court ended constitutional protections for abortion.
Activists hold signs after the Supreme Court ended constitutional protections for abortion.
AP

Paxton’s office says that can take about a month or longer, depending on if SCOTUS allows the rehearing.

“My office will publicly announce an effective date for the Act as soon as possible — and we look forward to doing so,” said Paxton, who went on to say his office plans to “strictly enforce the law.”

“Today, the question of abortion returns to the states. And in Texas, that question has already been answered: abortion is illegal here. I look forward to defending the pro-life laws of Texas and the lives of all unborn children moving forward,” said Paxton.

Anti-abortion protestors celebrate.
Anti-abortion protestors celebrate.
James Keivom
Anti-abortion protesters celebrate outside the Supreme Court on June 24.
Anti-abortion protesters react outside the Supreme Court on June 24.
James Keivom

The Texas trigger law would restrict abortions starting at conception, makes no exceptions to end a pregnancy due to rape, incest, fetal abnormality or when a fetus is not expected to survive after birth.

The one exemption it does make is when the life or heath of the mother is at risk.


Source link

Tags
Show More

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close